Task 50
Task 50
SHC Task 50

Advanced Lighting for Retrofitting Buildings

Publications

Search:
| Advanced Search | Clear
Order by:

The following are publications developed under Task 50:

General Task Publications

Task 50 Brochure Task 50 Brochure
Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings
July 2013 - PDF 1.45MB - Posted: 2013-07-16
The overall objective is to accelerate retrofitting of daylighting and electric lighting solutions in the non-residential sector using cost effective best practice approaches, which can be used on a wide range of typical existing buildings.

Subtasks

Subtask A: Market and Policies

T50 A.1 Global Economic Models
Task 50 Subtask A Report A1
May 2016 - PDF 2.89MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
This reports presents financial data related to lighting installations, before and after retrofit operations. Data are calculated over a large number of years to combine installation costs, maintenance, and energy use. The general principle was to compare the running costs of the “do nothing” approach (keeping the installation as it is and let it die gradually), and the costs associated with a retrofit with highly efficient equipment.

For these reasons, long term costs of installation are quite sensitive to the initial cost, and the combined cost of electricity and energy efficiency. Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of lighting installations has been calculated for various types of buildings: offices, schools, homes and industrial buildings.

The data supplied attempt to answer to the following questions:
- Which installations are low hanging fruits (with shortest payback time)?
- For which type of building are retrofit operation more profitable?
- How do various parameters influence the payback time (investment costs, efficacy of luminaires and sources, cost of electricity, etc.)?

Then various financial models to initiate successful investments in retrofit operations with generally favourable potentials (like high number of operating hour with good reduction potentials of electric power density) were investigated:
- Direct investment by the user only, showing significant benefits after the payback time.
- Investment by the user based on loans. This extends payback time, but does not require too high of a financial contribution at the beginning.
- Leasing of the entire installation: the building owner does not own the installation. The lighting installation is rented (installation and operation is supplied by a third party). It appears that leasing is nowadays generally the best option is the best way to trigger lighting retrofit to overcome the barriers associated to investment.
T50 A.2 Barriers and Benefits; Building energy regulation and certification
Task 50 Subtask A Report A2
May 2016 - PDF 1.78MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
This report addresses in a first part barriers and benefits in lighting retrofits and in second part building energy regulations and certifications.

Barriers and benefits
Benefit of lighting retrofits should be addressed in a broad manner: energy saving, increased value (and rental value), improved functionality, human and social benefits. A possible way, which was pursued in this study, was to compare benefits of lighting retrofits with benefits of other types of retrofits or actions (change of furniture, change of floor, etc.). Also various barriers which lead to postponement of lighting retrofits were identified, even when they are needed and cost effective.

Building Energy Regulation and Certification
Buildings are designed, constructed and operated in the context of standards, regulations or labels (e.g. sustainability labels). For typical and representative approaches on component and system basis critical analysis and comparisons were conducted. With respect to now highly efficient SSL lighting, measures like requesting a minimum luminaire efficiency, taking old installations (luminaires) out of operation and demanding a maximum energy demand on the basis of reference technologies are presented. In addition the sustainability labels LEED, BREEAM and DGNB were compared and recommendations for future developments
T50 A.3 Proposal of actions concerning the value chain
Task 50 Subtask A Report A3
May 2016 - PDF 0.89MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Marc Fontoynont, Jan de Boer, Johan Röklander, Karen Guldhammer, Nanna Sofie Gudmandsen, Yasuko Koga
In this activity, possible actions which could be taken to stimulate the development of lighting retrofit campaigns were identifies, based on the figures from report A.1 “Global economic models” and A.2 “Barriers and Benefits; Building energy regulation and certification”. It was looked into how lighting retrofit benefits are assessed by stakeholders (manufacturers, installers, building managers, etc.). Key strategic actions, or key strategic data to deliver to each stakeholder to possibly trigger a decision concerning lighting retrofit were investigated. The objectives are to identify possible lack of awareness and know-how in the value chain, and to identify strategic information to deliver to stakeholders. Globally, the actions concern accelerating retrofits before the end of existing life of lighting installations: this means that benefits justify an anticipated (before end of gear lifetime) investment.

Subtask B: Daylighting and Electric Lighting Solutions

T50 B.6 Daylighting and electric lighting retrofit solutions - A source book of IEA SHC Task 50
Task 50 Subtask B Report B6
October 2016 - Posted: 2016-11-03
By: Martine Knoop, Berat Aktuna, Bruno Bueno, Stanislav Darula, Arnaud Deneyer, Aicha Diakite, Peter Fuhrmann, David Geisler-Moroder, Carolin Hubschneider, Kjeld Johnsen, Andre Kostro, Marta Malikova, Barbara Matusiak, Patrick Prella, Wilfried Pohl, Luo Tao, Eino Tetri
Editor: Martine Knoop
Publisher: Martine Knoop
Energy efficient lighting is said to be one of the most cost-effective approaches to save energy and reduce C02 emissions. In order to stimulate the application of lighting retrofits of good quality, IEA Task 50, Subtask B “Daylighting and Electric Lighting solutions” has looked into the assessment of existing and new technical retrofit solutions in the field of façade and daylighting technology, electric lighting and lighting controls. The document provides information for those involved in the development of retrofit products or involved in the decision making process of a retrofit project, such as buildings owners, authorities, designers and consultants, as well as the lighting and façade industry. This source book addresses both electric lighting solu¬tions and daylighting solutions, and offers a method to compare these retrofit solutions on a common basis, including a wide range of quality criteria of cost-related and lighting quality aspects. Simple retrofits, such as replacing a lamp or adding interior blinds, are widely accepted, often applied because of their low initial costs or short payback periods. The work presented in this report aims at promoting state-of-the-art and new lighting retrofit approaches that might cost more but offer a further reduction of energy consumption while improving lighting quality to a greater extend.
ISBN: 978-3-7983-2836-5
T50 B.1 Catalogue of Criteria
Task 50 Subtask B Report B1
September 2015 - PDF 1.51MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Martine Knoop, Patrick Prella, Wilfried Pohl, Arnaud Deneyer Additional: Berat Aktuna, Stanislav Darula, David Geisler-Moroder, Kjeld Johnsen, Marta Malikova, Luo Tao, Eino Tetri
Using 30 quality measures, the Catalogue of Criteria can describe the performance of highly differentiated lighting retrofit solutions, qualitatively and to some degree quantitatively. It allows for comparison of state-of-the-art, new and future retrofit solutions on an equal and holistic basis. This approach promotes lighting retrofits that might cost more but also offer more benefits, which is reflected in the solutions’ quality defined by means of the Catalogue of Criteria. The set of criteria are used as basis for rating the 38 investigated technologies in the source book “Daylighting and electric lighting retrofit solutions”.
The Technology Viewer of the Lighting Retrofit Adviser is developed to convey the collected information within IEA Task 50, including approximately 50 different retrofit solutions. This tool within the Lighting Retrofit Advisor offers both a ‘quick glance’ on the retrofits’ performance for easy comparison, as well as detailed information on the selected solutions. When using the Catalogue of Criteria, future retrofit solutions can be compared with the currently available solutions as well.

Subtask C: Methods and Tools

T50 C.1 Lighting retrofit in current practice - Evaluation of an international survey
Task 50 Subtask C Report C1
May 2016 - PDF 1.48MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Jérôme Kaempf, Bernard Paule Additional: Magali Bodart, Bruno Bueno, Stanislav Darula, Arnaud Deneyer, David Geisler-Moroder, Niko Gentile, Anna Hoier, Kjeld Johnsen, Yasuko Koga, Cláudia Naves David Amorim, Eino Tetri
Surveys and socio-professional studies carried out at national and international levels \contribute to a better understanding of the lighting retrofit process. Within the framework of the International Energy Agency Task 50 - Advanced lighting solutions for retrofitting buildings- and its subtask C1 focusing on the analysis of workflows and needs, an online survey on lighting retrofit was initiated in December 2013.
After 9 months, more than 1000 answers were collected. The survey provides clear insights about the workflow of building professionals and leads to a better understanding of their needs in terms of computer method and tools.
One of the main outcomes of the survey is that retrofittig strategies used in practice essentially focus on electric lighting actions such as of luminaires replacement and the use of controls. Generally, daylighting strategies are not rated as the highest priority. The results also indicate that practitioners mainly rely on their own experience and rarely involve external consultants in the lighting retrofit process. Furthermore, the survey results suggest
that practitioners are interested in user-friendly tools allowing quick evaluations of their project, with a good compromise between cost and accuracy, and producing reports that can be directly presented to their client.
The survey also emphasized that the main barriers in using simulation tools are essentially their complexity and the amount of time it takes to perform a study. Practitioners are keen to use tools at preliminary design stage and would like to be able to estimate the cost and other key figures (energy consumption and lighting levels). The paper concludes with recommendations for the building software developers to address the needs of practitioners in a more suitable way.
T50 C.2 Methods and tools for lighting retrofits - State of the art review
Task 50 Subtask C Report C2
May 2016 - PDF 17.93MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Jérôme Kaempf, Bernard Paule Additional: Chantal Basurto, Magali Bodart, Jan de Boer, Bruno Bueno, Marie-Claude Dubois, David Geisler-Moroder, Marina Fusco, Markus Hegi, Michael Jorgensen, Nicolas Roy, Jan Wienold
This document proposes a state-of-the art review of the existing method and tools available on the market for practitioners. As starting point, the most used software were taken from the survey realised within C1, and those were categorised in four categories:
1) Facility management tools (global diagnostic tool including economic aspects)
2) Computer-assisted architectural drawing / Computer-aided design tools
3) Visualization tools
4) Simulation tools
The third category regarding the visualisation tools contains a warning for the practitioners, as they are not providing tangible results in terms of physical numbers. In total 20 software were described, and their main features compared in a table for a quick reference. Furthermore, the simulation tools were assessed using a case-study of a school refurbishment. Equivalent information given to practitioners was used to define the properties of the room (2D plans and photometric properties). Simulation experts were asked to simulate for daylight the daylight factor and for electric lighting the work plane illuminance.
Results indicate a rather large dispersion for daylighting results between the different tools, even though the case-study was described with great care. However, on electric lighting the results remain within 10-15% range from the median value. The obtained results indicate that practitioners can rely on electric consumption computed by the tools during night time,
but that the combination of daylight and electric light remains a challenge for simulation tools.
T50 C.4 Energy audit and inspection procedures
Task 50 Subtask C Report C4
May 2016 - PDF 9.17MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Jérôme Kaempf, Bernard Paule Additional: Chantal Basurto, Magali Bodart, Jan de Boer, Marie-Claude Dubois, David Geisler-Moroder, Kjeld Johnsen, Michael Jorgensen, Jan Wienold
This document consists of three parts dealing with energy audit and inspection procedures The first section (2.1: Daylight performance assessment methods), deals with the description of the different metrics available to evaluate the daylight contribution. These metrics are distinguished in two categories: Daylight availability metrics and daylight glare metrics. For each of them, a short description is given, followed by an example. Then comes a paragraph describing the boundaries of the metric and some references. The topic of the second section (2.2 Investigation of energy monitoring procedures for
electric lighting systems) is addressed in detail within the framework of subtask D (Casestudies). This chapter does not intend to report on this work, but simply focuses on the presentation of a “flash” analysis method used in Switzerland to assess the lighting status of existing buildings. This simple method, based on a quick tour of the building, is used as a kind of checklist. Insofar as it does not include detailed monitoring (only a few punctual illuminance measurements) it does not intend to draw a detailed view of the situation but aims to identify the potential actions for lighting refurbishment.
In the third section (2.3 Benchmark on case-study) we show, for the different metrics, the results obtained by the simulation tools described in C-2 document. The case study corresponds to the “After Refurbishment” situation described in C2 document (cf. C2.6.1 Description of the case study for lighting simulations).
T50 C.5 Advanced and future simulation tools
Task 50 Subtask C Report C5
May 2016 - PDF 8.04MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Jérôme Kaempf, Bernard Paule Additional: Jan de Boer, Eike Budde, Bruno Bueno, David Geisler-Moroder
The document reflects a study about the so called “advanced and future simulation tools”. The denominated software is able to simulate Complex Fenestration Systems (CFS) which are composed of solar shading and daylight redirection systems. Those systems might have complex light transmission properties named Bidirectional Transmission Distribution Functions (BTDF) that can be monitored using gonio-photometers or simulated using raytracing tools. Five tools able to simulate CFS were examined in a variant of the refurbished case study of C2. Four kinds of CFS were considered, ranging from clear glass to lasercut panel, and were benchmarked with daylight factor values on the work plane and renderings in sunny conditions. The results showed a large discrepancy in the results for the daylight factor values, indicating the difficulty to simulate daylight likewise in the document C2. The renderings with sunny conditions let the user of the tools appreciate the deviation effect of the lasercut panel for instance, but the obtained images are bound to the intrinsic resolution of the monitored BTDF which may be coarse depending on the source of data. The advanced and future simulation tools can give an interesting indication of the light distribution through CFS, but practitioners should remain aware of the limits of the method using monitored data bound to a defined resolution. The results are satisfactory enough to get an idea of illuminance profiles or even heat transmission, but not for tasks that require a precise luminance distribution such as glare index calculation.

Subtask D: Case Studies

T50 D.1 Building Stock Distribution and Electricity Use for Lighting
Task 50 Subtask D Report D1
May 2016 - PDF 3.21MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Marie-Claude Dubois Additional: Jan de Boer, Arnaud Deneyer , Peter Fuhrmann, David Geisler-Moroder, Anna Hoier, Roman Jakobiak, Martine Knoop, Yasuko Koga, Werner Osterhaus, Bernard Paule, Peter Pertola, Sophie Stoffer, Eino Tetri
This report presents an analysis of the current distribution of the building stock in the nonresidential
sector, which allows identifying the most important building types. The report also
presents the current average energy intensity for electric lighting for each building type as
well as characteristics of existing lighting installations in these buildings. The analysis
concludes that five building types cover the largest floor space area:
1. Offices,
2. Educational buildings,
3. Wholesale and retail trade,
4. Industrial buildings,
5. Agriculture buildings.
Three other non-residential building types should be given a second priority:
1. Hotels and restaurants,
2. Hospitals and healthcare,
3. Sports buildings.
Data from Sweden, the Netherlands and the United States indicate that fluorescent lighting
is clearly the dominant light source in non-residential premises, that LED lighting is still very
scarce and that there are still many incandescent light sources installed in non-residential
buildings.
T50 D.2 Daylighting and lighting retrofit to reduce energy use in non-residential buildings: A literature review
Task 50 Subtask D Report D2
May 2016 - PDF 0.86MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Primary: Marie-Claude Dubois, Niko Gentile Additional: Fabio Bisegna, Martine Knoop, Barbara Matusiak, Werner Osterhaus, Sophie Stoffer, Eino Tetri
This report presents a literature review about energy-efficient retrofit of electric lighting and
daylighting systems in buildings. The review, which covers around 160 research articles,
discusses the following energy retrofit strategies: replacement of lamp, ballast or luminaire;
use of task-ambient lighting design; improvement in maintenance; reduction of maintained
illuminance levels; improvement in spectral quality of light sources; improvement in occupant
behavior; use of control systems; and use of daylighting systems. The review indicates that
existing general knowledge about lighting retrofit is currently very limited and that there is a
significant lack of information concerning the actual energy performance of lighting systems
installed in the existing building stock. The resulting key directions for future research
highlights issues for which a better understanding is required for the spread and
development of lighting retrofit.
T50 D.3 Monitoring protocol for lighting and daylighting retrofits
Task 50 Subtask D Report D3
May 2016 - PDF 1.74MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Marie-Claude Dubois, Niko Gentile, Cláudia Naves David Amorim Additional (in alphabetical order): David Geisler-Moroder, Roman Jakobiak, Barbara Matusiak, Werner Osterhaus, Sophie Stoffer
This document presents a monitoring protocol to assess the overall performance of a lighting and/or daylighting retrofit of a building. This protocol covers four key aspects:
1. Energy use;
2. Retrofit costs;
3. Photometric assessment;
4. User assessment.
This document develops each aspect in detail, presenting the required measurements and necessary equipment as well as providing guidelines for data analysis.
The protocol is written as a general guideline document which could be used by non-expert assessors. A step-by-step general procedure is described, including five main phases, where each phase is described in detail, including the required documentation for two distinct monitoring levels: a ‘basic’ and a ‘comprehensive’ monitoring level.
T50 D.5 Lessons learned from monitoring lighting and daylighting in retrofit projects
Task 50 Subtask D Report D5
May 2016 - PDF 1.12MB - Posted: 2016-09-22
By: Cláudia Naves David Amorim, Marie-Claude Dubois, Niko Gentile, Werner Osterhaus, Sophie Stoffer Additional: David Geisler-Moroder, Roman Jakobiak, Barbara Matusiak
This report presents the general lessons learned from the investigated 24 case studies from 10 countries.

Other

Newsletters

IEA SHC Task 50 Newsletter #2
Newsletter #2
June 2016 - PDF 1.99MB - Posted: 2016-06-02
By: Jan de Boer
With the activities in Task 50, we aimed at improving the lighting refurbishment process in non-residential buildings in order to unleash energy saving potentials while at the same time improving lighting quality. This newsletter presents an overview on key results of IEA SHC Task 50 and provides reference to further information.
IEA SHC Task 50 Newsletter #1
March 2015
March 2015 - PDF 0.69MB - Posted: 2015-04-13
Lighting accounts for approx. 19% (~3000 TWh) of the global electricity consumption. Without essential changes in
policies, markets and practical implementations it is expected to continuously grow despite significant and rapid technical improvements, like solid-state lighting, new façade and light management techniques. With a small volume of new buildings, major lighting energy savings can only be realized by retrofitting the existing building stock. Compared to existing installations, the majority of new solutions allow a significant increase in efficiency – easily by a factor of three or more – going along with highly interesting payback times. However, lighting refurbishments are still lagging behind
compared to what is economically and technically possible and feasible.

Articles

Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings
Interview with Jan de Boer
December 2016 - PDF 0.14MB - Posted: 2016-12-08
Editor: Pamela Murphy
Publisher: IEA SHC
The IEA SHC Programme wrapped up its work on Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings (Task 50) this year, and is developing a new Task on the topic of Integrated Solutions for Daylight and Electric Lighting: From Component to User Centered System Efficiency. To learn first hand about the impact Task 50 has had in this field, we asked Jan de Boer, the Task Operating Agent, a few questions.
Improving Lighting Retrofits
December 2016 - PDF 0.66MB - Posted: 2016-12-08
Editor: Pamela Murphy
The recent IEA SHC Task on lighting set out to accelerate retrofitting of daylighting and electric lighting solutions in the non-domestic sector using cost effective, best practice approaches that could be used on a wide range of typical existing buildings.
Task 50: Bypassing Barriers to Lighting Retrofit: Is Solid State Lighting Already Changing the Game?
May 2015 - PDF 0.24MB - Posted: 2016-03-20
By: Marc Fontoynont
In comparison with a lighting solution using fluorescent sources, Solid State Lighting (LED) comes with different technical, operational (maintenance) and economical parameters. Work within IEA SHC Task 50: Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings studied the impact of these fast changing parameters on lighting retrofits – intending to give sound advice to decision makers.

Highlights

Task 50 Highlights 2015
Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings
April 2016 - PDF 1.21MB - Posted: 2016-04-08
Lighting accounts for approximately 19% (~3000 TWh) of global electric energy consumption. Without essential changes in policies, markets and practical implementations, it is expected to continuously grow despite significant and rapid technical improvements like solid-state lighting, new façades and light management techniques. Major lighting energy savings can be realized by retrofitting existing out-of-date lighting installations, as new solutions allow a significant increase in efficiency along with highly interesting payback times. However, lighting refurbishments are still lagging behind compared to what is economically and technically possible and feasible.
Task 50 Highlights 2014
Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings
February 2015 - PDF 0.21MB - Posted: 2015-02-12
Lighting accounts for approximately 19% (~3000 TWh) of global electric energy consumption. Without essential changes in policies, markets and practical implementations, it is expected to continuously grow despite significant and rapid
technical improvements like solid-state lighting, new façades and light management techniques. Major lighting energy savings can be realized by retrofitting existing out-of-date lighting installations, as new solutions allow a significant increase in efficiency along with highly interesting payback times. However, lighting refurbishments are still lagging behind compared to what is economically and technically possible and feasible.
Task 50 Highlights 2013
Advanced Lighting Solutions for Retrofitting Buildings
February 2014 - PDF 0.5MB - Posted: 2014-03-03
Lighting accounts for approximately 19% (~3000 TWh) of the global electric energy consumption. Without essential changes in policies, markets and practical implementations, it is expected to continuously grow despite significant and rapid technical improvements like solid-state lighting, new façade and light management techniques. Major lighting energy savings can be realized by retrofitting existing out of date lighting installations, as new solutions allow a significant increase in efficiency combined with highly interesting payback times. However, lighting refurbishments are still lagging behind compared to what is economically and technically possible and feasible.